Faculty / Alexandria Trombley

Faculty / Chris Rogers

Faculty / Daniel Hannon

Faculty / Dave Miller

Faculty / David Aurelio

Faculty / Gary Leisk

Faculty / Harold Miller-Jacobs

Faculty / Holly Taylor

Faculty / James Intriligator

Faculty / Jennifer Buxton

Faculty / Linda Borghesani

Faculty / Louisa Chiesa

Faculty / Mary Stearns

Faculty / Maxwell Bischoff

Faculty / Michael Wiklund

Faculty / Nathan Ward

Education:

alexandria.trombley@ul.com

Education:

  • PhD, Stanford University
  • MS, Stanford University
  • BSME, Stanford University

chris.rogers@tufts.edu

Education:

  • Ph.D., Experimental Psychology, Brown University, Providence, United States, 1991
  • Sc. M., Experimental Psychology, Brown University, Providence, United States, 1987
  • B.A., Psychology, Nazareth College, Rochester, United States, 1985
  • M. S., Community Mental Health Counseling, Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, United States, 2008

dan.hannon@tufts.edu

Education:

  • PhD, Stanford University
  • MA, New York University
  • BS, Cornell University

dave.miller@tufts.edu

Education:

  • Ph.D., Human-Machine Systems, Northeastern University, 2002
  • M.S., Occupational Health and Safety Engineering, University of Michigan, 1985
  • B.S., Engineering Psychology, Tufts University, 1982

david.aurelio@tufts.edu

Education:

  • B.S. Tufts University, Medford, United States 1989
  • M.S. Tufts University, Medford, United States 1992
  • Ph.D. Tufts University, Medford, United States 1998

gary.leisk@tufts.edu

Education:

harold.miller-jacobs@tufts.edu

Education:

  • B.A., Dartmouth College
  • PhD, Stanford University

holly.taylor@tufts.edu

Education:

  • Ph.D., Harvard University
  • M.A., Harvard University
  • B.A., University of California, San Diego

james.intriligator@tufts.edu

Education:

  • MAT, Regis College, Weston, United States, 2018
  • MA, Tufts University, Medford, United States, 2003
  • BS, University of New Hampshire, Durham, United States, 1996

jennifer.buxton@tufts.edu

Education:

  • Ph.D., Experimental Psychology, Brown University, Providence, United States, 1991
  • Sc. M., Experimental Psychology, Brown University, Providence, United States, 1987
  • B.A., Psychology, Nazareth College, Rochester, United States, 1985
  • M. S., Community Mental Health Counseling, Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, United States, 2008

linda.borghesani@tufts.edu

Education:

  • Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • B.S., Universita’ degli Studi

luisa.chiesa@tufts.edu

Education:

mary.stearns@tufts.edu

Education:

maxwell.bischoff@tufts.edu

Education:

  • B.S. Tufts University, Medford, United States
  • M.S. Tufts University, Medford, United States

michael.wiklund@tufts.edu

Education:

  • PhD, Cognition & Neural Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 2013
  • MA, Cognition & Neural Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 2010
  • BA, Classical Studies, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI, United States, 2007

nathan.ward@tufts.edu

Alexandria Trombley

Part-time Lecturer

What Classes Do I Teach?

My Advice

Chris Rogers

Professor, Mechanical Engineering John R. Beaver Professor in Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Chris Rogers’ current research work falls into four areas: (1) manufacture of musical instruments (Steinway and Sons and Conn-Selmer), (2) engineering education (LEGO Education, LEGO Foundation, PTC, Kodosky Foundation and the NSF), (3) educational robotics (LEGO, NSF, National Instruments), and (4) education outreach (LEGO Foundation, LLL Foundation). The first is mainly aimed at optimizing existing manufacturing processes and the other three look at ways of understanding how students think and then using that knowledge to develop new educational technologies and work with teachers and schools in the use of these technologies.

As a founding member of the Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach, Rogers’ additional work falls into four parts: (1) education research, (2) tool development, (3) outreach, and (4) teacher professional development. Through the Center, CEEO works with thousands of teachers every year as part of the LEGO engineering conference circuit and the LEGOEngineering.com website. CEEO collaborates with a dozen universities and industries in developing volunteer programs to assist teachers in bringing engineering into the classroom. CEEO also develops tools (LEGO-based and around movie making) to increase opportunities for kids. Finally, CEEO combine this work with education research to inform development and outreach strategies.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP-0099 – Internship En Psychology
ENP-0296 – Engineering Psy Master’s
ME-0035 – Intro Robotics & Mech
ME-0094 – Undergraduate Research

My Advice

When posed with the choice of “what I want to do because I enjoy it and I’m good at it” and “what I should do because that’s what people are doing”, always choose the former.

Daniel Hannon

Professor of the Practice, Mechanical Engineering

As a professor of the practice, Dan Hannon is engaged in the ‘practice’ of human factors engineering in industry, and also collaborates on research projects on campus. Presently, his work is focused in multiple areas, including transportation human factors, medical product design, educational technology, team performance, and the use of technology in mental health practice. His work includes system design, integration and analysis, as well as empirical investigation, human-in-the-loop simulation, and the modeling of human performance. As an educator, Hannon is particularly interested in the development of methods for teaching human factors engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels and in the creation of learning opportunities for students.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP164 – Behavioral Statistics for Engineering
ENP 162 – Human Machine Interaction
ENP 161 – Human Factors in Product and System Design
ENP 064 – Methods in Human Factors Engineering
ME193 – Assistive Design
ME 40 – Engineering Design
ENP193 – Multicultural Elements in Design 

My Advice

Human factors/engineering psychology is an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field.  Therefore, I recommend a program of study that is diverse in terms of learning different perspectives and approaches to understanding people and how things work and are made in the world around you.  Now is a good time to find out what you don’t like to do as much as what you do like to do, so don’t be afraid to try and possibly fail at things.  What matters is what you take away from the experience.  During your career, you will need to communicate with many people from other disciplines, so develop the soft skills of listening and perspective taking.  Above all, remember that in this field you have a unique opportunity to affect people’s lives for the better.

Dave Miller

Assistant Teaching Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Dave Miller earned his doctorate in communication research from Stanford University, where he studied human-computer moral conflict and the human factors challenges of interaction with partially-automated systems. Subsequently he taught at Cornell University and led research focused on enhancing reading performance at the University of Central Florida. Prior to this, he studied persuasive interface design at New York University, earning a master’s degree from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, and worked with the Persuasive Technology Lab and the Center for Design Research at Stanford University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in human-environment relations with minor in psychology from Cornell University, and has worked in human factors consulting on projects as diverse as revising the design of Disney character suits and character actor choreography to reduce injury risk, optimizing baggage handling operations, collaborating on the design of barcode scanners, and enhancing hospital infection control procedures.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP-0064 – Methods for Human Factors Engineering
ENP-0166 – Computer Interface Design

My Advice

Human factors is the critically important study that touches everything you touch and interact with, and that most people don’t know exists.

David Aurelio

Lecturer, Psychology Part-time Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

David Aurelio has spent the interim in industry designing the user interfaces for consumer, medical and industrial products.  He has been awarded three design awards, and two contribution awards from various organizations.  To increase the focus on users, he started user experience groups at two companies.  He has held several positions for the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and was a 10-year research review panelist for the National Research Council concerning Human Factors engineering.  He earned a mid-career Ph.D. that focused on how to present and visualize information to users of products and systems.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP 120 – Senior Capstone
ENP 220 – Masters Capstone
ENP 293 –
ENP 264 –
PSY 130 – Advanced Engineering Psychology

My Advice

Study hard, and promote yourself to let others know about your HFE knowledge and skills.

Gary Leisk

Associate Teaching Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Gary Leisk pursues research in the areas of: (1) materials processing and characterization; (2) design of automated systems; and (3) robot development using novel soft materials/mechanisms. Working as part of highly interdisciplinary teams, Leisk has focused on applying design skills to the creation of new materials (e.g., composites), structures, and actuation strategies in furthering efforts in tissue engineering and soft-bodied robotics.

I am a “Triple Jumbo,” receiving 3 degrees from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, but not consecutively. My first full-time job out of undergrad was at General Electric as a Mechanical Design Engineer working on defense-related systems. After going back to Tufts for grad school, I did post-doctoral research at MIT/Draper Lab studying the aging of precision equipment and then at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) researching the ability to predict equipment failure before it happens. While in a faculty role, I spent 10 years collaborating on big projects associated with soft robotics and tissue engineering. But I currently find myself more interested in small projects, especially with a human-centric theme.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ME 10 – Materials & Manufacturing I
ME 40 – Engineering Design I
ME 41 – Engineering Design II
ME 70 – Instruments & Experiments
ME 74 – Senior Capstone
ENP 114 – Ergonomics
ME 140 – Inventive Design
ENP/ME 193 – Assistive Design

My Advice

Seek out opportunities to work on diverse teams. Experience working on projects with people who have different backgrounds and perspectives is invaluable, especially if the project requires knowledge that spans disciplines.

Harold Miller-Jacobs

Part-time Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

What Classes Do I Teach?

My Advice

We are embarking on an exciting new era of Human Factors Engineering with the coming of age of AI.
Become part of the excitement, don’t just read about it!

Holly Taylor

Professor, Psychology Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Holly A. Taylor received her bachelors degree in mathematics, with a minor in Psychology from Dartmouth College in 1987. She earned a PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Stanford University in 1992. She has been a faculty at Tufts since 1994. In addition to her work, she enjoys running road races, hiking, and spending time with her family.

Dr. Taylor’s research examines the mental representation of information, sometimes referred to as mental models or situation models. She is particularly interested in the domains of spatial cognition and comprehension. Her work focuses on how information sources influence mental models. For example, if someone learns the Tufts University campus by walking around versus from a map, how different and how similar are their mental models? This work also extends to multimedia information sources and their effects on mental representations. In addition to basic research in this area, she is interested in applications to real-world information sources. Another area of research, in collaboration with Dr. Robin Kanarek, examines nutritional effects on cognitive behavior, in both children and adults.

Students can get involved in research with Dr. Taylor during the academic year either through one of the independent research courses or on a volunteer basis. If interested, please email Dr. Taylor.

What Classes Do I Teach?

PSY 28 – cognitive psychology
PSY 124/224 – cognition of the games people play
PSY 145/245 – mental representation

My Advice

Much of what you think about in the context of HFE/ENP has very broad applications to life. Step back and think about how.

James Intriligator

Professor of the practice

James Intriligator is Professor of the Practice in Human Factors Engineering and Director of Strategic Innovation (Mechanical Engineering) at Tufts University. James earned his Ph.D. in psychology and did a postdoc in neurology (Harvard). Afterwards, he left academia to lead innovation processes in industry roles. In 2003, he moved to Bangor University (UK) as a pioneer in consumer psychology – and over 13 years he grew the world’s leading consumer psychology program. In 2014 he was named a National Teaching Fellow (highest teaching honor in the UK). In 2016 he joined Tufts to lead the university’s renowned Human Factors Engineering program.

Intriligator is the author of over 50 publications in fields as diverse as human factors engineering, neuroscience, neurology, consumer psychology, physics, and literary criticism. Intriligator’s latest research is in the domain of next-generation human-machine systems. This broad area covers everything from assistive and social robots, to baggage scanners, to VR systems, to military and medical devices. In addition to his work within the university, he also works with global organizations as well as local social-enterprise and social-justice groups.

Intriligator’s broader research interests include design thinking and motivation, marketing, branding/packaging, consumer perceptions and experience, perception, cognition, attention, emotion, and entrepreneurialism.

Since arriving at Tufts Intriligator has been nominated for a Tufts Distinction Award, shortlisted for Professor of the Year, and won a university-wide Teaching with Technology award.

What Classes Do I Teach?

EN-0001 – Applications in Engineering: Impact of Self-Driving Cars
ENP-0064 – Methods for Human Factors Eng.
ENP-0099 – Internship En Psychology
ENP-016 – Human Factor Prod Design
ENP-0296 – Engineering Psy Master’s

My Advice

Get involved! Join clubs, volunteer in labs, join hackathons, design new stuff and systems to make the world a better place.

Jennifer Buxton

Lecturer, Occupational Therapy

Jennifer C. Buxton, M.A., OTR/L, ATP, M.A.T. is an occupational therapist and assistive technology professional within the Augmentative Communication Program (ACP) at Boston Children’s Hospital. Jennifer assesses and implements alternative access technologies for augmentative communication solutions, with focus on alternative computer, environmental and educational technologies. Jennifer also works in her private consulting practice, Assistive Technology Partners, and teaches the cross-college course, Assistive Technology, at Tufts University to OT and engineering students. She has presented nationally and internationally at ATIA, ISAAC, RESNA, and WFOT.

What Classes Do I Teach?

OTS105/ENP105 – Assistive Technology Foundations
OTS108/ENP108 – Assistive Technology Innovations

My Advice

Be open to designing for all and including expert end users with disabilities from the community in your design process

Linda Borghesani

Part-time Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

As a professor of the practice, Dan Hannon is engaged in the ‘practice’ of human factors engineering in industry, and also collaborates on research projects on campus. Presently, his work is focused in multiple areas, including transportation human factors, medical product design, educational technology, team performance, and the use of technology in mental health practice. His work includes system design, integration and analysis, as well as empirical investigation, human-in-the-loop simulation, and the modeling of human performance. As an educator, Hannon is particularly interested in the development of methods for teaching human factors engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels and in the creation of learning opportunities for students.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP164 – Behavioral Statistics for Engineering
ENP 162 – Human Machine Interaction
ENP 161 – Human Factors in Product and System Design
ENP 064 – Methods in Human Factors Engineering
ME193 – Assistive Design
ME 40 – Engineering Design
ENP193 – Multicultural Elements in Design 

My Advice

Human factors/engineering psychology is an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field.  Therefore, I recommend a program of study that is diverse in terms of learning different perspectives and approaches to understanding people and how things work and are made in the world around you.  Now is a good time to find out what you don’t like to do as much as what you do like to do, so don’t be afraid to try and possibly fail at things.  What matters is what you take away from the experience.  During your career, you will need to communicate with many people from other disciplines, so develop the soft skills of listening and perspective taking.  Above all, remember that in this field you have a unique opportunity to affect people’s lives for the better.

Louisa Chiesa

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Luisa Chiesa is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Tufts School of Engineering. Her teaching interests include sustainable energy, thermodynamics and applied thermodynamics, cryogenic and superconductivity, strength of materials, mechanics of materials, and material science. Her primary research interest is superconducting materials for large powerful magnets to be used in particle accelerators, medical devices, and fusion energy machines. Superconductors are exciting materials that are able, under the right conditions, to carry large currents with no resistive dissipation. This characteristic makes them well suited to be used for electromagnets, to reduce the overall size and cost of the devices that employ such materials. Chiesa’s lab specializes in electrical and mechanical measurements of those materials.



Luisa Chiesa’s primary research area is superconducting materials for energy application. Her current research focus is the electro-mechanical behavior of superconducting materials for large magnets used in fusion power devices. Fusion reactors could play a key role in the power production of future generations. Powerful superconducting magnets are used to confine the plasma created in the fusion vessel. During operations, these magnets are subjected to extremely large forces that could reduce the overall performance of the superconducting material they are made of, jeopardizing the overall performance of the machine. To succeed in building such systems, it is critical to investigate the electro-mechanical properties of superconducting materials. Experimental work in this subject is performed at Tufts University, in collaboration with several national laboratories.

This research is also of interest for other energy applications, such as superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and superconducting transmission lines. These technologies could play a significant role in power storage and delivery, which are the backbone for the successful implementation of renewable energy sources. As these energy sources (solar and wind, in particular) are inherently intermittent, efficient ways of storing and delivering energy are necessary components to improve their reliability. The measurements performed in Chiesa’s laboratory are unique and focus mainly on superconductors, but the equipment available can be used to test different categories of materials.

What Classes Do I Teach?

PSY53/ENP53 – Intro to Engineering Psych
PSY147 – Multitasking Seminar
PSY130/ENP130 – Advanced Engineering Psych

My Advice

Mary Stearns

Part-time Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

What Classes Do I Teach?

My Advice

Maxwell Bischoff

Part-time Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

What Classes Do I Teach?

My Advice

Michael Wiklund

Professor of the Practice, Mechanical Engineering

I received my BS and MS degree from Tufts. My BS is in Engineering Design, which included human factors studies back in the early 1980s. I have worked on range of wide projects including the design or nuclear power plant control rooms, developing a radio system for military aircraft, designing wheelchairs, conducting research on mascara applicators, developing HFE guidance for the design of voting machines, designing anesthesia workstations, developing guidance for the design of electronic medical records, and designing a home hemodialysis machine. Over 40+ years in HFE consulting, I have probably touched over 500 products and worked with hundreds of talented HFE specialists. I have always had a strong interest in medical technology and ultimately started my own consulting firm in 2005 to focus in that realm. This company grew over several years, employed many Tufts graduates, and was acquired by UL in 2012. Since then, I have managed the teams growth from 12 to over 60 HFE specialists who work on three continents. I have enjoyed writing about HFE and co-authored and edited several books on the topic. My hobbies include oil painting, bicycling, and urban explorations (particularly in Europe).

I am a Professor of the Practice. As such, I actually work full-time for UL, leading its human factors practice. I have taught one evening per week at Tufts for 35 years in a row now. The majority of my consulting work is focused on applying human factors to make medical technology safe, effective, and satisfying to use. The products we work on range from heart-lung machines to dialysis machines to hospital beds to drug injection devices, plus websites and apps linked to medical devices.

What Classes Do I Teach?

ENP 110 – Human Factors In Medical Technology
ENP 109 – Medical Fundamentals

My Advice

Try to avoid “just cruising” through any of your courses. Give them your utmost energy and creativity so that you take away the greatest benefits. Also, seek meaningful internships that complement your studies and match your interests. Internships give you the opportunity to validate your area(s) of interest as well as a jump start in the job market.

Nathan Ward

Associate Professor, Psychology

Dr. Ward received his PhD in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Utah in 2013. He then completed a Beckman Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before starting at Tufts in 2016.

Dr. Ward’s research is focused on understanding and improving the ability to manage multiple streams of information (i.e., multitasking) both in the lab and in real-world settings. His work aims to unpack the cognitive mechanisms that support multitasking, such as task switching and dual tasking, as well as to understand whether these and other mechanisms are differentially engaged across the lifespan. To this end, Dr. Ward uses several approaches, ranging from simulated environments to speeded response times, in order to assess real-time multitasking performance in younger and older adults. Dr. Ward also relies on interventions like cognitive training, exercise, and low-current brain stimulation to modulate how people multitask under a variety of scenarios.

Graduate and undergraduate students interested in working in the lab are encouraged to contact Dr. Ward.

What Classes Do I Teach?

PSY53/ENP53 – Intro to Engineering Psych
PSY147 – Multitasking Seminar
PSY130/ENP130 – Advanced Engineering Psych

My Advice

The map is not the territory.